Posted in acupuncture, chronic pain, health, PTSD

Consider this Way to Relieve Chronic Pain

Some of the earliest medical acupuncture texts have survived since 200 B.C. and are still being used to teach students today. When you consider the fact that acupuncture has been used to treat patients for nearly 3,000 years, microsystems acupuncture is a relatively new practice.

Ear acupuncture, or (auricular therapy), is a type of acupuncture that approaches the ear as a microsystem of the body. Similar to reflexology, it treats this one body part in an attempt to treat symptoms elsewhere.

It was popularized in the 1950s by a French doctor, Dr. Paul Nogier, and was created as a bridge between Eastern and Western acupuncture. These days, most acupuncturists will use it in tandem with full-body acupuncture.

Practitioners insert very fine needles into set points in the ear, often prompting quick — sometimes immediate — results. Ear acupuncture can be used to treat chronic pain, isolated injury, stress, addiction, and more.

Let’s dive into this new variation on an ancient healing practice:

How does it work?

Continue reading “Consider this Way to Relieve Chronic Pain”

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Posted in abuse, mental health, psychotherapy, PTSD

Words Can Hurt ~ Think before you speak

My mother is a narcissist.  Heartless words that spewed out of my mother’s mouth growing up remain with me to this day.  My mother’s own advice was “think before you speak”, yet somehow she never captured this wisdom and applied it to herself.  I believe my mom doesn’t regret any of her cruel words.

As for me, I’ve said some nasty words to people over the years that were hurtful, must have stung and I feel regretful, however, I’m wondering if it stems from my childhood?

The article below is from PsychCentral Embracing Balance, (written by Nicole Lyons):

“Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt Me.” is a little ditty that I have not and will not sing or say to my children — not ever. I understand the context of this children’s rhyme and the effect that it is supposed to have, throwing it out there is saying that the taunt has no effect and I’m choosing to ignore it and remain calm. While I agree with teaching my children to remain calm in situations where bullying can be present, this rhyme does absolutely nothing for their confidence and self-esteem because, in reality, it’s a lie — words hurt.

Continue reading “Words Can Hurt ~ Think before you speak”

Posted in child abuse, migraines, PTSD

Childhood trauma may raise the risk of migraines

Image result for childhood abuse migraines:

Study found witnessing parental domestic violence produced most powerful association

Experiencing a traumatic event during childhood may raise the risk for migraines as an adult, new Canadian research suggests.

“We found the more types of violence the individual had been exposed to during their childhood, the greater the odds of migraine,” study author Sarah Brennenstuhl, from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release.

“For those who reported all three types of adversities — [witnessing] parental domestic violence, childhood physical and sexual abuse — the odds of migraine were a little over three times higher for men and just under three times higher for women,” Brennenstuhl said.

The findings were reported online recently in the journal Headache. To reach their conclusions, researchers looked at data from a mental health survey involving nearly 23,000 men and women over the age of 18.

“The most surprising finding was the link between exposure to parental domestic violence and migraines,” study co-author Esme Fuller-Thomson, a professor and chair at University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, said in the news release.

Girls who had witnessed parental domestic violence grew up to be women with a 64 percent greater risk for migraines, compared with those with no such history. For men, the bump in risk amounted to 52 percent, the investigators found.

And the team noted this association held up even after taking into account a wide range of influential factors, such as age, race, a history of depression or anxiety, and any history of childhood physical and/or sexual abuse.

However, the study did not prove a cause-and-effect link between childhood trauma and migraine risk.

Source from HealthDay.com:

More information: Visit the U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for more on migraines.

SOURCE: University of Toronto, news release, June 24, 2015